The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies at Penn brings manuscript culture, modern technology and people together.


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Fifty-two discoveries from the BiblioPhilly project, No. 7/52 Book of Hours, Use of Paris, Philadelphia, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1924‑19‑1, fol. 24r (miniature of the Annunciation from the Hours of the Virgin) 1,581 more words

via “Love and Humility are the sweet bonds of our marriage:” A Book of Hours owned by the wife of a French Catholic propagandist of the 16th century, and the Governor of Pennsylvania! — Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis


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Sacred Texts: Codices Far, Far Away – Episode 6, LJS 384

On October 8, 2018, Dr. Brandon Hawk and curator Dot Porter met to talk about these ancient books, and to compare them with manuscripts from the collection of the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania. This series is a record of those discussions.

LJS 384, an early astronomical text

In this section of our conversation we discuss LJS 384, a mid-12th century (c. 1150) copy of William of Conches De philosophia mundi, an early astronomical text, and we talk specifically about the astronomical systems being described by medieval thinkers and how they differ from the systems we think we see being described in the manuscripts in The Last Jedi. We also talk about one of our favorite topics, the use of manuscripts over time, and how the Star Wars manuscripts show (or don’t) this very important aspect of medieval manuscripts.

Online record and digital images of LJS 384: http://hdl.library.upenn.edu/1017/d/medren/9946262693503681

Video Facsimile of LJS 384 (pages turned front-to-back, no commentary): https://youtu.be/0BfGz4T2-3g

Phil Szostak, The Art of Star Wars: The Last Jedi (https://www.amazon.com/Art-Star-Wars-Last-Jedi/dp/1419727052/)
Images of the “Tree Library” by Seth Engstrom & Rodolfo Damaggio
Mock-ups for six pages from the Jedi books by Chris Kitisakkul

Screenshots from the film and images from The Art of Star Wars are used under the Fair Use doctrine described in Section 107 of the Copyright Act (https://www.copyright.gov/title17/92chap1.html#107)


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Fifty-two discoveries from the BiblioPhilly project, No. 6/52 Georges Chastellain, c. 1402/1410–1475, L’outré d’amour pour amour morte, Philadelphia, The Rosenbach Museum and Library, MS 443/21, fol. 1r, with miniature showing The author dreaming While being attentive to the circumstances surrounding the genesis and production of a Medieval or Renaissance manuscript is often our primary concern…

via The earliest known French bookstamp, and a new addition to the library of a colorful bibliophile: Jacques Thiboust of Bourges — Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis


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Fifty-two discoveries from the BiblioPhilly project, No. 5/52 Book of Hours, Use of Rome, Philadelphia, Free Library of Philadelphia, Lewis E 107, fol. 100v (miniature of the Crowning of Thorns with instructions in left margin) Marginal directions for illuminators—be they in written or in sketch form—are relatively common in the thirteenth century, and though they…

via A helping hand: barely discernible instructions for a miniaturist — Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis


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Fifty-two discoveries from the BiblioPhilly project, No. 4/52 Stella di Salute, Philadelphia, Free Library of Philadelphia, Lewis E 205, fol. 1r (introductory rubric with the name of the author and date of composition) John Frederick Lewis’ wonderful collection of two hundred Western Medieval codices, dozens of non-European manuscripts, and thousands of cuttings and single leaves…

via The Star of Salvation, an unknown Franciscan devotional dialogue in Italian with a lost sister copy in Croatia — Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis


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Sacred Texts: Codices Far, Far Away – Episode 5, LJS 43

On October 8, 2018, Dr. Brandon Hawk and curator Dot Porter met to talk about these ancient books, and to compare them with manuscripts from the collection of the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania. This series is a record of those discussions.

LJS 43 – Qaṣāʼid, a collection of Lyric Poems

In this video we talk about at LJS 43, a sixteenth-century collection of poetry from Persia. We compare the illuminated headers and the framing of the text with the design of the Star Wars manuscripts, and how the headers and frames in the Jedi texts would help Rey (or anyone else) read and understand them.

Online record and digital images of LJS 43: http://hdl.library.upenn.edu/1017/d/medren/9954043173503681

A video orientation to this manuscript can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKS6bcyUo3s

Screenshots from the film and images from The Art of Star Wars are used under the Fair Use doctrine described in Section 107 of the Copyright Act (https://www.copyright.gov/title17/92chap1.html#107)


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Fifty-two discoveries from the BiblioPhilly project, No. 3/52 Book of Hours, Use of Rome, Bethlehem, PA, Lehigh University, Linderman Library, Codex 19, fol. 3r Lehigh University’s small but excellent collection of Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts deserves to be better known–and soon will be thanks to the Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis digitization project! Only the first sixteen of…

via The identification of a Spanish patron for a neglected Book of Hours — Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis