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Fifty-two discoveries from the BiblioPhilly project, No. 17/52 Gallican Psalter with Canticles, Litany, and Prayers (he Lewis Psalter), Philadelphia, Free Library of Philadelphia, Lewis E 85, fols. 1v–2r (historiated initial B with King David Playing the Harp and King David Slaying Goliath; blank page with later prayer to Saint Martial) One of the glorious treasures…

via The Early History of the Lewis Psalter — Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis


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Manuscript Monday: Ms. Coll. 390, Item 409 – Śivamukhyasahasranāmastotra, 1671

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s Ms. Coll. 390, Item 409 – Śivamukhyasahasranāmastotra, 1671. This manuscript was written in Sanskrit and is used for public or private recitation or prayer and worship (pūjā), venerating and praising a thousand names associated with the Hindu deity Śiva. It is part of a larger work known as the Śivarahasya and it is presented as a discourse between Hara (Śiva) and his son Kumāra (known also as Kārttikeya).

You can see the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand and you can download all of the images and metadata from OPenn. You can also download a copy of this video from ScholarlyCommons, the University of Pennsylvania’s open access institutional repository.

 


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Fifty-two discoveries from the BiblioPhilly project, No. 16/52 Book of Hours for the Use of Rome (Hours of Étienne Thirion), Philadelphia, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1945‑65‑14, inside front cover (with Arthur Brölemann bookplate) and Book of Hours for the Use of Rome (Victorines d’Auxy Hours), Philadelphia Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1945–65–15, inside front cover…

via Vigilance and Prudence (and stickers): Books from the Brölemann Collection — Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 224 – Expositio in libros Posteriorum Aristotelis

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 224,  Expositio in libros Posteriorum Aristotelis, by Paolo, Veneto. This manuscript was written in Italy between 1425 and 1475, in Latin, and it is a commentary on Aristotle’s Posterior analytics, in which syllogistic reasoning is applied to scientific proof or demonstration.

You can see the full online facsimile of this work at Penn in Hand  and you can download all of the images and metadata at OPenn. You can also download a copy of this video from ScholarlyCommons, the University of Pennsylvania’s open access institutional repository.

 


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Fifty-two discoveries from the BiblioPhilly project, No. 15/52 Book of Hours for the Use of Rome (here identified as the Hours of Étienne Thirion), Philadelphia, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1945‑65‑14, fols. 25v–26r (end of the “Ave cuius conceptio” prayer and beginning of the Hours of the Virgin; owner kneeling in prayer before the Annunciation)…

via Introducing the Hours of Étienne Thirion, hyperopic Receiver General of Montréal — Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 238 – Assise of all manner of breade

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 238, Assise of all man[n]er of breade. This manuscript, written in Winchester in the 16th century, is a table of prescribed weights for varieties of loaves for different prices of wheat. It bears the heading The statute of wynchestre.

You can see the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand and you can download all of the images and metadata  at OPenn. You can also download a copy of this video from ScholarlyCommons, the University of Pennsylvania’s open access institutional repository.

 


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Fifty-two discoveries from the BiblioPhilly project, No. 14/52 A volume with a rust stain from eyeglasses, presented with an actual pair of eyeglasses in front of it (exhibited in Le verre, un moyen-âge inventif, Musée National du Moyen-Âge-Thermes de Cluny, 20 September 2019 – 8 January 2018); Book of Hours for the Use of…

via A “Spectacular” Discovery: imprints of eyeglasses and their specific context in a Book of Hours — Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis