The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies at Penn brings manuscript culture, modern technology and people together.


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Reactions: Medieval/Modern

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Reactions: Medieval/Modern, the current exhibition in the Penn Library’s Goldstein Family Gallery, located in the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, on the 6th floor of the Van Pelt Dietrich Library. The exhibition can be seen from August 25 through December 16, 2016.

In conjunction with the 9th Annual Lawrence J. Schoenberg Symposium (November 17-19, 2016) of the same theme, Reactions: Medieval/Modern explores the many and varied ways that people have reacted to, and acted upon, manuscripts from the Middle Ages up to today. Reactions take many forms. They include the manipulation of physical objects through, for example, the marking up of texts, addition of illustrations, the disbinding books or rebinding fragments, as well as the manipulation of digital objects, thanks to new technologies involved in digitization, ink and parchment analysis, virtual reconstruction, among many other processes. Both the exhibition and symposium will also tackle how popular culture has reacted to manuscripts over time as witnessed by their use and appearance in books, games, and films.

 

 


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CFP for Kalamazoo 2017: New Work on Manuscripts in Philadelphia: Looking towards the Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis Project

In 2015, a collaboration led by the Philadelphia Area Consortium of Special Collections Libraries (PACSCL) and including 15 institutions was awarded $500K from the Council on Library and Information Resources forthe Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis project, which will digitize and put into the public domain over 400 manuscript codices. This session will celebrate the launch of the project by presenting a variety of papers showcasing the range of collections that will be made available through the BiblioPhilly project.

Have you been working with manuscripts from Philadelphia area collections? Consider submitting a proposal to participate in our session, sponsored by the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies. Please email a brief abstract to Dot Porter at dorp at upenn dot edu by September 15th for consideration.


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Call for Papers for the SIMS Manuscript Studies Journal

We are seeking submissions for our journal, Manuscript Studies, for 2017 and beyond. The journal is open to contributions that rely on both traditional methodologies of manuscript study and those that explore the potential of new ones. We seek articles that engage in a larger conversation on manuscript culture and its continued relevance in today’s world and highlight the value of manuscript evidence in understanding our shared cultural and intellectual heritage. Studies that incorporate digital methodologies to further understanding of the physical and conceptual structures of the manuscript book are encouraged. A separate section, entitled Annotations, features research in progress and digital project reports. Book, digital project, and exhibition reviews will also be included.For more information and to subscribe, go to http://mss.pennpress.org.

The following articles will be featured in the first issue, to be published April 2016. For subscription information, please visit the website.

  • Christopher Blackwell, Christine Roughan, and Neel Smith, Citation and Alignment: Scholarship Outside and Inside the Codex
  • Benjamin J. Fleming, The Materiality of South Asian Manuscripts from the University of Pennsylvania MS. coll. 390 and the Rāmamālā Library in Bangladesh
  • Evyn Kropf, Will that Surrogate Do?: Reflections on Material Manuscript Literacy in the Digital Environment from Islamic Manuscripts at the University of Michigan Library
  • Nigel Ramsay, Towards a Universal Catalogue of Early Manuscripts: Seymour de Ricci’s Census of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the United States and Canada
  • Linda H. Chance and Julie Nelson Davis, The Handwritten and the Printed: Issues of Format and Medium in Japanese Premodern Books
  • Timothy L. Stinson, (In)Completeness in Middle English Literature: The Case of the Cook’s Tale and the Tale of Gamelyn
  • Y. Tzvi Langermann, Transcription, Translation, and Annotation: Observations on Three Medieval Islamicate Medical Texts in UPenn MS Codex 1649

 


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OPenn: New Additions

Here is a list of the most recent new additions to OPenn

(Shelfmark, Title, Date uploaded, Link to OPenn):

Univ. of Penn Books & Manuscripts – 32 items

Ms. Codex 1276, *[Property inventory of Bivigliano de’ Medici],* Dec. 21, 2015, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1276.html

Ms. Codex 1277, *[Ledger of debtors and creditors],* Dec. 21, 2015, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1277.html

Ms. Codex 1038, *[Recipe book],* Jan. 6, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1038.html

Ms. Codex 1278, *[Ledger of Medici debtors and creditors],* Jan. 6, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1278.html

Ms. Codex 1279, *[Ledger of Medici debtors and creditors],* Jan. 6, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1279.html

Ms. Codex 1280, *[Ledger of Medici debtors and creditors],* Jan. 6, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1280.html

Ms. Codex 1281, *[Ledger of Medici debtors and creditors],* Jan. 7, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1281.html

Ms. Codex 1283, *[Ledger of Medici debtors and creditors],* Jan. 7, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1283.html

Ms. Codex 1284, *[Ledger of Medici debtors and creditors],* Jan. 7, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1284.html

Ms. Codex 1286, *[Ledger of Medici debtors and creditors],* Jan. 7, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1286.html

Ms. Codex 1287, *[Ledger of Medici debtors and creditors],* Jan. 7, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1287.html

Ms. Codex 1288, *[Ledger of Medici debtors and creditors],* Jan. 7, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1288.html

Ms. Codex 1289, *[Ledger of Medici debtors and creditors],* Jan. 7, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1289.html

Ms. Codex 129, *[Feuerwerkbuch],* Jan. 7, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex129.html

Ms. Codex 1290, *[Ledger of Medici debtors and creditors],* Jan. 7, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1290.html

Ms. Codex 1291, *[Ledger of Medici accounts],* Jan. 7, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1291.html

Ms. Codex 1292, *[Ledger of Medici debtors and creditors, memoranda and other records],* Jan. 7, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1292.html

Ms. Codex 1293, *[Ledger of Medici debtors and creditors],* Jan. 7, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1293.html

Ms. Codex 1294, *[Ledger of Medici accounts],* Jan. 8, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1294.html

Ms. Codex 1295, *[Ledger of Medici accounts],* Jan. 8, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1295.html

Ms. Codex 1296, *[Ledger of Medici debtors and creditors],* Jan. 8, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1296.html

Ms. Codex 1297, *[Ledger of Medici accounts],* Jan. 8, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1297.html

Ms. Codex 1298, *[Ledger of Medici debtors and creditors],* Jan. 8, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1298.html

Ms. Codex 1299, *[Ledger of Medici accounts],* Jan. 8, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1299.html

Ms. Codex 1372, *[Notebook of Amadori memoranda],* Jan. 8, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1372.html

Ms. Codex 1373, *[Ledger of Amadori debtors and creditors],* Jan. 8, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1373.html

Ms. Codex 1374, *[Ledger of Amadori debtors and creditors],* Jan. 8, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1374.html

Ms. Codex 1375, *[Notebook of Amadori memoranda],* Jan. 8, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1375.html

Ms. Codex 1380, *[Ledger of Amadori debtors and creditors],* Jan. 8, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1380.html

Ms. Codex 1381, *[Ledger of Amadori accounts and memoranda],* Jan. 8, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1381.html

Ms. Codex 1382, *[Ledger of Amadori memoranda],* Jan. 8, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1382.html

Ms. Codex 1384, *[Ledger of Amadori accounts],* Jan. 8, 2016, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0002/html/mscodex1384.html

Other – 2 items

Archimedes Palimpsest, Dec. 21, 2015, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0014/ArchimedesPalimpsest/

Galen Syriac Palimpsest, Dec. 21, 2015, http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0014/GalenSyriacPalimpsest/


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Penn Libraries’ OPenn Manuscript Portal to Host the Country’s Largest Regional Collections of Digitized Medieval Manuscripts

Free Library of Philadelphia Lewis E 7, Processional, f. 116v (http://libwww.freelibrary.org/medievalman/ecw.cfm?ItemID=mca0071162)

Free Library of Philadelphia Lewis E 7, Processional, f. 116v (http://libwww.freelibrary.org/medievalman/ecw.cfm?ItemID=mca0071162)

Philadelphia, PA, January 6th, 2016—The Penn Libraries is proud to announce their role as online host and one of the leaders in a partnership that will create the country’s largest regional collection of digitized medieval manuscripts. This role is made possible through a grant of almost $500,000 awarded to Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis, a new project organized by the Philadelphia Area Consortium of Special Collections Libraries (PACSCL) and funded by the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) with generous support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The project, involving a total of 15 partner institutions, and led by the Penn Libraries, the Free Library of Philadelphia, and Lehigh University, will complete the digitization and online presentation of virtually all of the region’s medieval manuscripts – a total of almost 160,000 pages from more than 400 individual volumes. PACSCL first showcased the variety and depth of Philadelphia collections in a 2001 exhibition, “Leaves of Gold: Manuscript Illumination from Philadelphia Collections,” at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.  The exhibition and its associated catalogue drew heavily upon the manuscripts to be digitized in this project and sparked a surge in scholarly interest in the Philadelphia collections.

The manuscripts in this project range from simple but functional texts intended for the students of science, philosophy, and religion to jewel-like works of art in the collections of such institutions as Bryn Mawr College, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Free Library of Philadelphia’s Rosenbach Museum.

Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis’ images and metadata will be hosted by the Penn Libraries’ manuscript portal, OPenn (http://openn.library.upenn.edu). The images will be released into the public domain at high resolution and available for download (by the page, manuscript, or collection) with descriptive metadata. “Penn Libraries is thrilled to be collaborating with the Philadelphia Area Consortium of Special Collections Libraries to create data on the Middle Ages for the twenty-first century from American collections,” remarked William Noel, Director of the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at the Penn Libraries.

The project participants include the following area libraries and museums: Bryn Mawr College, Chemical Heritage Foundation, College of Physicians of Philadelphia, Franklin and Marshall College, Free Library of Philadelphia (lead contributor and co-principal investigator) Haverford College, Lehigh University (principal investigator, fiscal agent, and dark archive), Library Company of Philadelphia, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Rosenbach Museum and Library, Swarthmore College, Temple University, University of Delaware, University of Pennsylvania (OPenn host and lead imaging/metadata center), Villanova University.

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About the Penn Libraries
The Penn Libraries serve the world-class faculty and students of Penn’s 12 schools. The Libraries’ collections comprise more than 7 million volumes, over 100,000 journals, some 2 million digitized images, and extraordinary rare and unique materials that document the intellectual and cultural experience of ancient and modern civilizations. Through our collaborative relationships, we supplement Penn’s great local collections with physical access to the Center for Research Libraries (approximately 5 million items), the combined holdings of the Ivies (more than 70 million volumes), and exclusive electronic access to some 2 million public domain titles in the HathiTrust. Today, the Libraries play an instrumental role in developing new technologies for information discovery and dissemination and are noted for groundbreaking work in digital library design.  To learn more about the Penn Libraries, visit http://www.library.upenn.edu.

Press Contact:
Sara Leavens
lesara@upenn.edu