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Fifty-two discoveries from the BiblioPhilly project, No. 22/52 Book of Hours for the Use of Rome, University of Pennsylvania, Ms. Codex 688, fol. 13r The Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis project did not formally include manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania, which had already been digitized and made available on the OPenn repository several years ago. However, these…

via Before Breakfast?? Instructions for Weekday Prayers in a Venetian Dialect — Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis


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Fifty-two discoveries from the BiblioPhilly project, No. 21/52 Commissione issued to Andrea Valier by Leonardo Loredan, 1502, Bethlehem, Lehigh University, Linderman Library, Codex 21, fol. 1r (all’antica frontispiece illuminated by the First Pisani Master) It is always gratifying to learn that one’s own manuscript “discovery” has already been made. Knowing that other scholars have come…

via All’antica: Getting up-to-date with the Ancients — Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis


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Fifty-two discoveries from the BiblioPhilly project, No. 20/52 Book of Hours, Use of Rouen, Philadelphia, Free Library of Philadelphia, Lewis E 126, fols. 14v–15r (miniatures showing the Procès de Paradis or Parliament of Heaven and the Annunciation) A few weeks ago, we saw how an early-sixteenth-century manuscript illuminator, the so-called Master of the Entries…

via The “Parliament of Heaven”: Tracking a Theatrical Iconography — Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis


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Fifty-two discoveries from the BiblioPhilly project, No. 19/52 Choirbook, Italy (Siena?), c. 1300, Philadelphia, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1883.53, fol. 247r and Neroccio de’ Landi, Panel with Saints Christina of Bolsena(?), Catherine of Alexandria, Jerome, and Galganus, c. 1470, Phipadelphia, Philadelphia Museum of Art, John G. Johnson Collection, 1917, cat. 1169 (detail of Saint…

via A Mineralogist’s “Sword in the Stone” — Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis


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Dispatch from the Manuscripts of the Muslim World project

UPenn Ms. Codex 1904, front cover, blind tooled with flap binding

Kelly Tuttle, cataloger for the Manuscripts of the Muslim World project, has written a great post about Penn’s Ms. Codex 1904 on the Special Collections Processing at Penn blog.  Working from outside to inside and front to back, she begins,

Penn has an eclectic mix of Arabic, Persian and Ottoman Turkish manuscripts that are now being cataloged as part of the Manuscripts of the Muslim World (MMW) project. The project is cataloging and digitizing previously ‘hidden’ materials from Penn and other Philadelphia area repositories. Along the way, lots of fun discoveries are being made about items that have been sitting, uncatalogued, on the shelves for years.

One of the first discoveries we made as part of the MMW project is Ms. Codex 1904, a small format Qurʾān. It measures only 87 mm square and from the outside, it looks much like any other pocket-sized Qurʾān with a blind tooled cover and a flap-style binding. A binding with a flap on the left side that goes over the fore-edge and under the upper cover is quite common for codices produced in the Islamicate world.

Check out the whole post, A Small, Maltese Qurʾān.  The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies and the Penn Libraries are thrilled to be participating in this project!


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Sacred Texts: Codices Far, Far Away – Episode 7, Coptic Church bifolium

On October 8, 2018, Dr. Brandon Hawk and curator Dot Porter met to talk about these ancient books, and to compare them with manuscripts from the collection of the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania. This series is a record of those discussions.

Misc Mss (Large) Box 1 Folder 24

In this brief excerpt we talk about a bifolium from a Coptic liturgical manuscript, which includes selections from Luke’s Gospel (chapter 5) and John’s Gospel (chapter 4) as well as readings from the Psalms. We see similarities between the Coptic script and the as-yet-unknown script in the Jedi texts.

Online record and digital images of Misc Mss (Large) Box 1 Folder 24: http://hdl.library.upenn.edu/1017/d/medren/9914711803503681

Phil Szostak, The Art of Star Wars: The Last Jedi (https://www.amazon.com/Art-Star-Wars-Last-Jedi/dp/1419727052/)
Images of the “Tree Library” by Seth Engstrom & Rodolfo Damaggio
Mock-ups for six pages from the Jedi books by Chris Kitisakkul

Screenshots from the film and images from The Art of Star Wars are used under the Fair Use doctrine described in Section 107 of the Copyright Act (https://www.copyright.gov/title17/92chap1.html#107)


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Fifty-two discoveries from the BiblioPhilly project, No. 18/52 Book of Hours, Use of Rome, Bethlehem, PA, Lehigh University, Linderman Library, Codex 18, fol. 1r (large miniature of the Arrest of Christ and bas-de-page vignette showing Judas Receiving the Thirty Pieces of Silver) Among the trove of great manuscripts from Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, are…

via A Book of Hours from Renaissance Lyon, with miniatures by a Master of Ceremonies — Bibliotheca Philadelphiensis