The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies at Penn brings manuscript culture, modern technology and people together.


Leave a comment

Manuscript Monday: LJS 267 – De ludo scacchorum…

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 267, De ludo scacchorum seu de moribus hominum et officiis nobilium … [etc.]. This manuscript was written in Italy in 1409, in Latin, with a few poems in Italian. It is a compilation, mostly in Latin, of religious, literary, historical, and natural-historical works, including classical and contemporary selections, as well as letters by humanist writers Francesco Petrarca and Donatus Albanzani. Over a quarter of the manuscript is devoted to the De ludo scachorum of Jacobus de Cessolis, a collection of sermons about the proper relationships between a king and various classes of subjects, compared to the rules of chess.

You can see the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand and you can download all of the images and metadata at OPenn. You can also download a copy of this video from ScholarlyCommons, the University of Pennsylvania’s open access institutional repository.

 


Leave a comment

Manuscript Monday: LJS 37 – Euclid’s Elements (Arabic)

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 37, Euclid’s Elements (in Arabic). This manuscript was written in Egypt, Iraq, or Syria, A.H. 502-504 (1108-1111), and it is Epitome or abridgement in Arabic of Euclid’s Elements, written on paper.

You can see the full online facsimile of this work at Penn in Hand and you can download all of the images and metadata at OPenn. You can also download a copy of this video from ScholarlyCommons, the University of Pennsylvania’s open access institutional repository.

 


Leave a comment

Sacred Texts: Codices Far, Far Away – Episode 7, Coptic Church bifolium

On October 8, 2018, Dr. Brandon Hawk and curator Dot Porter met to talk about these ancient books, and to compare them with manuscripts from the collection of the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania. This series is a record of those discussions.

Misc Mss (Large) Box 1 Folder 24

In this brief excerpt we talk about a bifolium from a Coptic liturgical manuscript, which includes selections from Luke’s Gospel (chapter 5) and John’s Gospel (chapter 4) as well as readings from the Psalms. We see similarities between the Coptic script and the as-yet-unknown script in the Jedi texts.

Online record and digital images of Misc Mss (Large) Box 1 Folder 24: http://hdl.library.upenn.edu/1017/d/medren/9914711803503681

Phil Szostak, The Art of Star Wars: The Last Jedi (https://www.amazon.com/Art-Star-Wars-Last-Jedi/dp/1419727052/)
Images of the “Tree Library” by Seth Engstrom & Rodolfo Damaggio
Mock-ups for six pages from the Jedi books by Chris Kitisakkul

Screenshots from the film and images from The Art of Star Wars are used under the Fair Use doctrine described in Section 107 of the Copyright Act (https://www.copyright.gov/title17/92chap1.html#107)


Leave a comment

Manuscript Monday: Ms. Codex 681 – Book of hours

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s Ms. Codex 681, Book of hours. This manuscript was written in France, between 1450 and 1500, in Latin, and it is a fragment of a book of hours with French script.

You can see the full online facsimile of this work at Penn in Hand and you can download all of the images and metadata at OPenn. You can also download a copy of this video from ScholarlyCommons, the University of Pennsylvania’s open access institutional repository.

 


Leave a comment

Manuscript Monday: Ms. Coll. 390, Item 409 – Śivamukhyasahasranāmastotra, 1671

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s Ms. Coll. 390, Item 409 – Śivamukhyasahasranāmastotra, 1671. This manuscript was written in Sanskrit and is used for public or private recitation or prayer and worship (pūjā), venerating and praising a thousand names associated with the Hindu deity Śiva. It is part of a larger work known as the Śivarahasya and it is presented as a discourse between Hara (Śiva) and his son Kumāra (known also as Kārttikeya).

You can see the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand and you can download all of the images and metadata from OPenn. You can also download a copy of this video from ScholarlyCommons, the University of Pennsylvania’s open access institutional repository.

 


Leave a comment

Manuscript Monday: LJS 224 – Expositio in libros Posteriorum Aristotelis

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 224,  Expositio in libros Posteriorum Aristotelis, by Paolo, Veneto. This manuscript was written in Italy between 1425 and 1475, in Latin, and it is a commentary on Aristotle’s Posterior analytics, in which syllogistic reasoning is applied to scientific proof or demonstration.

You can see the full online facsimile of this work at Penn in Hand  and you can download all of the images and metadata at OPenn. You can also download a copy of this video from ScholarlyCommons, the University of Pennsylvania’s open access institutional repository.

 


Leave a comment

Manuscript Monday: LJS 238 – Assise of all manner of breade

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 238, Assise of all man[n]er of breade. This manuscript, written in Winchester in the 16th century, is a table of prescribed weights for varieties of loaves for different prices of wheat. It bears the heading The statute of wynchestre.

You can see the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand and you can download all of the images and metadata  at OPenn. You can also download a copy of this video from ScholarlyCommons, the University of Pennsylvania’s open access institutional repository.