The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies at Penn brings manuscript culture, modern technology and people together.


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 37 – Euclid’s Elements (Arabic)

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 37, Euclid’s Elements (in Arabic). This manuscript was written in Egypt, Iraq, or Syria, A.H. 502-504 (1108-1111), and it is Epitome or abridgement in Arabic of Euclid’s Elements, written on paper.

You can see the full online facsimile of this work at Penn in Hand and you can download all of the images and metadata at OPenn.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 224 – Expositio in libros Posteriorum Aristotelis

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 224,  Expositio in libros Posteriorum Aristotelis, by Paolo, Veneto. This manuscript was written in Italy between 1425 and 1475, in Latin, and it is a commentary on Aristotle’s Posterior analytics, in which syllogistic reasoning is applied to scientific proof or demonstration.

You can see the full online facsimile of this work at Penn in Hand  and you can download all of the images and metadata at OPenn.

 


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Manuscript Monday: New Acquisition – 15th-century Book of Hours and handwritten 19th-century companion volume

This week the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies received a great new acquisition, a 15-century Book of Hours and its 19th-century  companion volume. The Book of Hours was written in Latin, in France circa 1480, for the use of the Diocese of Toul (Lorraine). It is accompanied by a handwritten 19th-century companion volume/facsimile that Nick Herman of the Schoenberg Institute says “vividly narrates its rescue: ‘Ce manuscrit… était dans un état déplorable: relégué sur le haut d’une armoire, il gisoit dans la poussière parmi toute sorte de tracas; décousu, souillé, sans titre ni finis; ayant servi de jouet aux enfans; des filles du village avoient coupé des initiales de leur nom pour les coller dans leurs livres de prières…’” [This manuscript… Was in a deplorable condition; relegated to the top of a cupboard, it lay in the dust amid all sorts of tribulations; disbound, soiled, unlabeled and without a proper ending; it served as a toy for children; village girls had cut out the initials of their names and pasted them into their own prayer books.]

These items have not yet been cataloged by the University of Pennsylvania Libraries.

 

 


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Manuscript Monday: Ms. Coll. 390, Item 409 – Śivamukhyasahasranāmastotra, 1671

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s Ms. Coll. 390, Item 409 – Śivamukhyasahasranāmastotra, 1671. This manuscript was written in Sanskrit and is used for public or private recitation or prayer and worship (pūjā), venerating and praising a thousand names associated with the Hindu deity Śiva. It is part of a larger work known as the Śivarahasya and it is presented as a discourse between Hara (Śiva) and his son Kumāra (known also as Kārttikeya).

You can see the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand and you can download all of the images and metadata from OPenn.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 172 – Tabulae directionum et profectionum

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 172, Tabulae directionum et profectionum, by Joannes Regiomontanus. This manuscript was written in Austria or Hungary, circa 1476, in Latin, and it includes astronomical tables of declinations and ascensions and a table of sines, copied not long after their completion by Regiomontanus in 1467.

You can see the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand and you can download all of the images and metadata from OPenn.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 97 – Eis ta harmonika Ptolemaiou hypomnēma

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 97, Eis ta harmonika Ptolemaiou hypomnēma, byPorphyry . This manuscript was written in Spain or Italy, between 1560 and 1580, in Greek, and it contains Porphyry’s commentary on about half of Ptolemy’s treatise Harmonics, focusing on harmonics and acoustics.

You can see the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand and you can download all of the images metadata at OPenn.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 384 – De philosophia mundi, by William of Conches

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 384, De philosophia mundi, by William of Conches. This manuscript was written in Germany, circa 1150, in Latin, and it is a treatise in 4 books on astronomy, geography, meteorology, and medicine, followed by a work on Gospels attributed to Hugh of Saint-Victor.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.