The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies at Penn brings manuscript culture, modern technology and people together.


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 300 – Calendarium and ephemerides

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 300, Calendarium and ephemerides, by Joannes Regiomontanus. This manuscript was written in Lambach, Austria, ca. 1500, in Latin. Manuscript copy of the Calendarium and Ephemerides as published by Regiomontanus in 1474. The Calendarium, for 1475-1530, gives information on lunar and solar eclipses, the length of days, and the signs of the zodiac and planets. Also includes a table of time corrections (f. 11v) for cities in reference to a longitude of approximately 10 degrees east (thus making no correction for Braunschweig, Nuremberg, Ulm, or Milan). The Ephemerides, consisting only of tables updated to begin in 1480 and ending in 1506, provides positions for the sun, moon, and planets for each day of each year.

You can see the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand and you can download all of the images and metadata at OPenn.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 400 – Commentary on the Zīj Gūrgānī

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 400, Commentary on the Zīj Gūrgānī, also known as the Zīj-i jadīd-i Sultānī, by ʻAlī ibn Muḥammad Qūshjī. This manuscript was written in Iran, A.H. 899, in Persian, and it is comprised of tables of calendar calculations, trigonometry, planets, and stars compiled from observations made at the observatory in Samarqand.

You can see the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand and you can download all of the images and metadata from OPenn.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 472 – Ḥeshbon mahalkhot ha-kokhavim

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 472, Ḥeshbon mahalkhot ha-kokhavim, by Abraham bar Hiyya Savasorda. This manuscript was written in Spain during the 15th century, in Hebrew, and it is a copy of the second part of a 12th-century two-part treatise. This second part, on astronomy, includes computations for solar and lunar eclipses between 1135 and 1136.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand and you can download all of the images and metadata at OPenn.

 


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Book of Hours, Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, and other manuscripts, now on OPenn

Below is a list of 43 items added to OPenn in May 2017, including medieval manuscripts from the Free Library of Philadelphia, an autobiography of Benjamin Franklin (autograph manuscript signed) from The Huntington Library, and lecture notes from the Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing and the University Archives and Records Center, University of Pennsylvania.

(Shelfmark, Title, Date uploaded, Link to OPenn).

The Free Library of Philadelphia

10 Items


Fol. 1r., Lewis E 049 , *Breviary,* May 12, 2017,  http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0023/html/lewis_e_049.html

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Manuscript Monday: LJS 267 – De ludo scacchorum…

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 267, De ludo scacchorum seu de moribus hominum et officiis nobilium … [etc.]. This manuscript was written in Italy in 1409, in Latin, with a few poems in Italian. It is a compilation, mostly in Latin, of religious, literary, historical, and natural-historical works, including classical and contemporary selections, as well as letters by humanist writers Francesco Petrarca and Donatus Albanzani. Over a quarter of the manuscript is devoted to the De ludo scachorum of Jacobus de Cessolis, a collection of sermons about the proper relationships between a king and various classes of subjects, compared to the rules of chess.

You can see the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand and you can download all of the images and metadata at OPenn.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 37 – Euclid’s Elements (Arabic)

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 37, Euclid’s Elements (in Arabic). This manuscript was written in Egypt, Iraq, or Syria, A.H. 502-504 (1108-1111), and it is Epitome or abridgement in Arabic of Euclid’s Elements, written on paper.

You can see the full online facsimile of this work at Penn in Hand and you can download all of the images and metadata at OPenn.