The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies at Penn brings manuscript culture, modern technology and people together.


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 483 – Questions on Aristotle’s Physics

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 484, Questions on Aristotle’s Physics. This manuscript was written in Ingolstadt, circa 1480, in Latin, and it is a commentary on Aristotle’s Physics in the form of questions and answers following the content of the 8 books of the Physics.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 414 – Astrological compendium

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 414, Astrological compendium. This manuscript was written in Iran, ca. 1670 (A.H. 1081), in Persian, and it is a collection of astronomical works, including 2 on the astrolabe, a treatise on a horoscope referring to Khawaja Haji Ghulām Ḥusayn and the date A.H. 1047, and an illustrated work on Dhu al-Qarnayn, a Koranic figure later associated with legends of Alexander the Great.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 99 – Table of integer square roots

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 99, a table of integer square roots. This partially baked clay tablet was created in Iraq, between 1999 and 1800 B.C., in Sumerian. It is a table of numbers whose square roots are integers, in Babylonian sexagesimal notation.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 


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Middle Eastern Manuscripts from The Digital Walters featured on OPenn

Did you know that OPenn is hosting The Digital Walters, a data set of digitized manuscripts and TEI manuscript descriptions from the Walters Art Museum manuscript collection? Items in the collection are from all over the world, and from ancient to modern times. It features deluxe Gospel books from Armenia, Ethiopia, Byzantium, and Ottonian Germany; French and Flemish books of hours; as well as masterpieces of Safavid, Mughal and Ottoman manuscript illumination.

Among the items on The Digital Walters are the following Middle Eastern manuscripts. They were written between the 12th and 19th centuries, originated in Iran, Syria, and Turkey, and cover a wide range of topics including religion, poetry, and science. If you’d like to see more Middle Eastern and Islamic manuscripts from The Digital Walters in addition to the eight manuscripts featured below,  please check out Walters Art Museum Collection page on OPenn.

w567_000004_thumb  w567_000005_thumb

W. 567, Koran, Fol. 1b-2a. This manuscript is a small illuminated single-volume copy of the Qurʾan, likely produced in Iran. A date is inscribed on the final page, which is interpreted as 1230 AH / 1814-5 CE (fol. 186b). The manuscript opens with an illuminated double-page incipit with the verses of chapter 1 (Sūrat al-fātiḥah) and the initial verses of chapter 2 (Sūrat al-baqarah), decorated with interlinear illumination (fols. 1b-2a). http://openn.library.upenn.edu/Data/0020/Data/WaltersManuscripts/W567/

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Manuscript Monday: LJS 235 – Kitāb al-Adwār

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 235, Kitāb al-Adwār, by ʻAbd al-Muʼmin ibn Yūsuf Urmawī. This manuscript was written in the Ottoman empire during the 16th century, in Arabic, and it is a treatise on the theory of music, including division of frets, ratio of intervals, consonance and dissonance, cycles, rhythmic and melodic modes, and the 5-string oud or lute, with an anonymous commentary.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.