The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies at Penn brings manuscript culture, modern technology and people together.

SIMS Affiliates

Graduate Paleography Group
SIMS supports the Graduate Paleography Group at Penn, graduate students who gather weekly to (attempt to) read a variety of medieval and early modern handwritten texts.

Alberto Campagnolo, SIMS Research Associate, University of Udine, Italy
Alberto trained as a book conservator at the European Course for Conservators/Restorers of Book Materials (1998-2001) in Spoleto, Italy and has worked in that capacity in various institutions, amongst which the National Museum Wales, Palace Green Library at Durham University, Guildhall Library London, London Metropolitan Archives, St. Catherine’s Monastery (Egypt), and the Vatican Library. He studied Conservation of Library and Archive Materials (2001-2006) at Ca’ Foscari University Venice, Italy and then read for an MA in Digital Culture and Technology (2007-2009) at King’s College London. He pursued a PhD (2010-2015) on an automated visualization of historical bookbinding structures at the Ligatus Research Centre (University of the Arts, London). He was a CLIR/DLF Postdoctoral Fellow in Data Curation for Medieval Studies (2016-2018) at the Library of Congress (Washington, DC), and is now adjunct professor of Digital Humanities at the University of Udine, Italy.

Since 2013, Alberto has been collaborating with Dot Porter on VisColl, a modelling and visualization tool for the gathering structure of books in codex format.

Arthur Kiron, Schottenstein-Jesselson Curator of Judaica Collections
Originally from a small town on the Potomac called Washington, D.C.,  Arthur has strong credentials as an ultimate frisbee player.  In addition, he received his undergraduate degrees in political theory and women’s studies, his graduate training in religious studies and his PhD. in Jewish history.  His involvement in  digital humanities at Penn has been shaped by projects that have demonstrated how digital technologies allow us to search and discover meaningful connections among a global diaspora of Judaica primary sources (Penn/Cambridge Genizah Fragment Project, Jesselson-Kaplan American Genizah Project).

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