The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies at Penn brings manuscript culture, modern technology and people together.


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Fellowship Awarded

Announcing the first recipient of the combined SIMS-Katz Center Fellowship in Jewish Manuscript Studies and the David B. Ruderman Distinguished Scholar Fellowship

SIMS and the Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies are delighted to announce the first recipient of the combined Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies-Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies Fellowship in Jewish Manuscript Studies and the David B. Ruderman Distinguished Scholar Fellowship. Tzvi Langermann, Professor of Arabic at Bar-Ilan University in Israel and an internationally recognized authority on Hebrew and Arabic medicine and the study of scientific manuscripts, will be in residence in the summer of 2015 to research and catalog a 15th-century Sicilian medical miscellany containing texts and notes written in Judeo-Arabic, Hebrew, and Arabic. The manuscript is UPenn MS Codex 1649, a recent addition to the Penn Libraries’ extensive collection of medieval and early modern scientific manuscripts. It is believed to have been compiled by David ben Shalom, a Jewish physician active in Sicily at this time.

Of particular interest is a 15th-century copy of a treatise written in Judeo-Arabic by the 10th-century Persian physician ʻAlī ibn al-ʻAbbās Majūsī (also known by the Latinized name Haly Abbas) entitled Kāmil al-sināʻah al-tibbīyah or Complete Book of the Medical Art. In addition to this fundamental treatise on medical practice in the Arabic world, the manuscript also contains fragments of an unknown 15th-century Hebrew medical treatise and 19th-century notes in Arabic, Samaritan, and Hebrew. These notes were likely added to the manuscript when it was rebound in Ottoman Palestine.  The journey of the manuscript through time and across geographies is a striking testament to the multicultural currents underlying the practice of medieval and early modern medicine the Mediterranean world.

The SIMS-Katz Center Fellowship in Jewish Manuscript Studies presents an exciting opportunity to join the two institutions together in an effort to bring scholars to the Penn Libraries to research the university’s rich holdings in Judaic manuscript material. Fellows will share their discoveries and expertise at a public lecture to be held during or after their fellowship.  Details of Professor Langermann’s lecture in the fall of 2015 will be announced in August.


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 204 – Shesh kenafayim

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 204, Shesh kenafayim, by Immanuel ben Jacob Bonfils. This manuscript was written in Italy in 1509, in Hebrew, and it is an introduction and compilation in 6 divisions of astronomical tables concerning the movements of the sun and moon, solar and lunar eclipses, and the day of the new moon, calculated for the Jewish calendar and the longitude and latitude of Tarascon, Provence, the home of the author.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 223 – Questiones logicales

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 223,  Questiones logicales. The manuscript was written in Bavaria in 1510, in Latin, and it is a collection of Aristotelian works and other philosophical works, including works on logic; short tracts (some incomplete) on Aristotle’s Categories, De interpretatione, and Posterior analytics; and several works on Aristotle’s Physics (including commentaries by Antonius Carpentier on both the Physics and the introduction to the Physics by Jacques Lefèvre d’Etaples published in 1492).

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

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Manuscript Road Trip: Reconstructing the Beauvais Missal

Amey Hutchins:

The latest Manuscript Road Trip post by SIMS friend Lisa Fagin Davis announces a new adventure in digital fragmentology.

Originally posted on Manuscript Road Trip:

The Flight into Egypt, Walters Art Museum, MS W.188, f.112r The Flight into Egypt, Walters Art Museum, MS W.188, f.112r

If you’ve been travelling with me on this virtual road trip around the United States, you have almost certainly come to know the dismembered beauty known as The Beauvais Missal. I’ve mentioned it many times and shown you several different leaves found in various collections. And I’ve ruminated about the possibility of digitally reassembling this masterpiece of thirteenth-century illumination. Well, it’s time to stop dreaming and start doing.

Cleveland Museum of Art, ACC. 1982.141 verso Cleveland Museum of Art, Acc. 1982.141 verso

Working with the “Broken Books” project at the St. Louis University, I have begun a digital reconstruction of the Beauvais Missal. The “Broken Books” project will result in the development of a platform for reconstructing broken books as well as the establishment of a metadata structure designed specifically for manuscript fragments and leaves. My Beauvais Missal project will serve as one of several case studies in…

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Manuscript Monday: LJS 224 – Expositio in libros Posteriorum Aristotelis

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 224,  Expositio in libros Posteriorum Aristotelis, by Paolo, Veneto. This manuscript was written in Italy between 1425 and 1475, in Latin, and it is a commentary on Aristotle’s Posterior analytics, in which syllogistic reasoning is applied to scientific proof or demonstration.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 198 – De simplicibus

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 198,  De simplicibus, by Arnaldus, de Villanova. This manuscript was written in Spain, between 1350 and 1380, in Latin, and it is a compilation of simples (medicines made from one component) in 85 chapters with lists of plants for general medical functions and for treating specific parts of the body.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 188 – Ynstruction of the ephimeredes

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 188, Ynstruction of the ephimeredes. This manuscript was written in England ca. 1540, and it includes instructions in 22 chapters for the use of ephemerides, astronomical tables giving the positions of planets, the sun, and the moon. It includes tables for the latitude of the moon, hourly motion of planets, duration of lunar eclipses, and lunar motion. A table for the risings and settings of fixed stars is “rectyfyed to the yere of our Lorde 1540 complete”.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 

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