The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies at Penn brings manuscript culture, modern technology and people together.


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 46 – Herbal

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 46, Herbal. This manuscript was written in Italy and England, ca. 1520, ca. 1600. It is an Italian illustrated herbal, with a group of texts in English, Latin, and Spanish about Morocco added less than a century later.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 


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Primary Sourcery: Magic, Medicine, and a Beautiful Disaster – Rare Book School 2015

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Cancer_zodiac_LJS449

Image from LJS 449, which Kim Schwenk studied during her week at RBS.

Kim Schwenk participated in the Rare Book School course that Dot Porter and Will Noel taught this summer at Penn: “The Medieval Manuscript in the 21st Century.” This is a blog post about her final project. We’re glad she had such a great time!

Originally posted on Kim Schwenk:

“Of course, no one is suggesting that digital images of membrane pages should or can replace physical books as objects of study and teaching, and it must be noted that digitization projects, as they crack open manuscripts that may not have been examined carefully in many years, have led to immediate and significant discoveries on the ground. The point is that the digitization of the parchment inheritance yields (or at least has the potential to yield) a fundamentally different kind of information than that afforded by extended immersion in a much smaller number of manuscripts.  This is one of the principles of digital humanities, of course: that the computerized transformation and geometric expansion of the world’s archives invites new sorts of questions tied intimately to the modes of preservation, enhancement, indexing, and so on that capture the objects of digitization. Given the speed with which so much information (textual, visual…

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Manuscript Monday: LJS 49 – Rawḍat al-adhhān fī maʻrifat tashrīḥ badan al-insān

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 49, Rawḍat al-adhhān fī maʻrifat tashrīḥ badan al-insān, by Manṣūr ibn Muḥammad ibn Aḥmad. This manuscript was written in Persia, A.H. 813 (1411), in Persian and Arabic. It is a later copy, probably in the hand of the author, of an anatomy treatise originally written in 1396, with chapters on bones, nerves, veins, arteries and muscles, and complex organs.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 


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Tales of Three Texts, a lecture by Professor Y. Tzvi Langermann.

Thursday, September 3, 2015, 5:15pm, Class of 1978 Orrery Pavilion.

Tales of Three Texts: The Judaeo-Arabic and Hebrew Medical Texts in UPenn Ms. Codex 1649

codex1649b_300Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies-Herbert D. Katz Center Fellowship in Jewish Manuscript Studies and the David B. Ruderman Distinguished Fellowship Lecture

Professor Y. Tzvi Langermann, from Bar-Ilan University in Israel, will present his latest research on one of Penn Libraries’ recent acquisitions: a 15th-century medical miscellany (UPenn Ms. Codex 1649). Produced in Sicily, the manuscript contains texts written in Judaeo-Arabic, Hebrew, and Arabic, making it a fascinating witness to the cross-fertilization of ideas across borders and cultures in the history of medicine in the late Middle Ages. Presented in association with the Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies and the Jewish Studies Program in the School of Arts and Sciences.

This event is open to the public. For more information and to register for free, go to: http://www.library.upenn.edu/exhibits/three_texts.html

Class of 1978 Orrery Pavilion
Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Van Pelt Dietrich Library Center, sixth floor
3420 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 60 – Cosmographia

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 60, Cosmographia, by Mela, Pomponius. This manuscript was written in [Italy, between 1440 and 1450], in Latin, and it is a geographical work describing the populated areas of Europe, northern Africa, and western Asia as known to the historian and geographer Strabo. Many leaves of the manuscript are palimpsests, the parchment having been formerly used for legal documents and washed for re-use. The earlier texts are occasionally faintly visible running perpendicular to the Mela text.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 59 – Dogale issued by Doge Leonardo to Paolo Nani

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 59, Dogale, issued by Doge Leonardo to Paolo Nani, podestà and capitaneus of Treviso. This manuscript was written in Venice in 1517, in Latin and Italian. It is a commission from Leonardo Loredan, doge of Venice, addressed to Paolo Nani, concerning Nani’s duties, rights, and obligations while holding the positions of podestà (civil administrator) and capitaneus (military commander) of Treviso, a mainland community north of Venice under Venetian control.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 57 – Astronomical anthology

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 57, Astronomical anthology. This manuscript was written in Catalonia, ca. 1361, in Hebrew, and it is a collection of astronomical texts, including a copy of a treatise on the calendar originally compiled for Pedro IV, King of Aragon, with an almanac of oppositions and conjunctions of the sun and moon and predictions of lunar and solar eclipses; four short works by the 12th-century scientist Abraham Ibn Ezra on an introduction to astrology, choosing the most auspicious moment for a given activity, the zodiac, and astrology concerning humankind collectively; and a Hebrew translation of Ptolemy’s Almagest, with numerous tables, diagrams, and illustrations

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 

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