The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies at Penn brings manuscript culture, modern technology and people together.


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 226 – Certain astrological and astronomical figures

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 226, certain astrological and astronomical figures: cut out of a manuscript book dated 1410. This manuscript, written in Latin, is a collection of astrological and astronomical diagrams gathered from 3 earlier manuscripts.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 299 – Avicenna’s Medical Encyclopedia (in Hebrew)

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 299, a Hebrew translation of Avicenna’s medical encyclopedia. This manuscript was written in Yemen, ca. 1400-1525, and it is divided into 4 books (customary for Hebrew translations), but it also has unusual additional sections on drugs, the liver and intestines, and heart diseases.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 400 – Commentary on the Zīj Gūrgānī

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 400, Commentary on the Zīj Gūrgānī, also known as the Zīj-i jadīd-i Sultānī, by ʻAlī ibn Muḥammad Qūshjī. This manuscript was written in Iran, A.H. 899, in Persian, and it is comprised of tables of calendar calculations, trigonometry, planets, and stars compiled from observations made at the observatory in Samarqand.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 234 – Commentary on Aristotle’s Physics

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 234,  Liber phisicorum sive auditus phisici, by Albertus Magnus. The manuscript was written in France before 1349, in Latin, and it is a Commentary on Aristotle’s Physics, divided into 8 books.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 300 – Calendarium and ephemerides

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 300, Calendarium and ephemerides, by Joannes Regiomontanus. This manuscript was written in Lambach, Austria, ca. 1500, in Latin. Manuscript copy of the Calendarium and Ephemerides as published by Regiomontanus in 1474. The Calendarium, for 1475-1530, gives information on lunar and solar eclipses, the length of days, and the signs of the zodiac and planets. Also includes a table of time corrections (f. 11v) for cities in reference to a longitude of approximately 10 degrees east (thus making no correction for Braunschweig, Nuremberg, Ulm, or Milan). The Ephemerides, consisting only of tables updated to begin in 1480 and ending in 1506, provides positions for the sun, moon, and planets for each day of each year.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 457 – Logica parva

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 457,  Logica parva, by Paolo Veneto. The manuscript was written in Perugia, in 1475, in Latin, and it is a work on scholastic logic used in universities in the late 15th century, followed by a brief logical work by Paolo della Pergola, a student of Paolo Veneto.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 


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Manuscript Monday: LJS 195 – Medical miscellany

Dot Porter, Curator, Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library, offers a video orientation to Penn Library’s LJS 195, a medical miscellany. This manuscript was written in Italy between 1450 and 1499, in Middle High German with some Latin. It is a medical compilation with a particular focus on the plague, but also including information on diseases of different parts of the body, urine, medicines, laxatives, water and wine, and the making of pigments for painting and inks for writing.

See the full online facsimile of this work in Penn in Hand.

 

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